Movie Poster: “Paid in Full” AP440

Movie poster of “Paid in Full” is from the estate of the late actress “film noir siren” Lizabeth Scott (d. January 31, 2015)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Price on request.

“Paid in Full” was a 1950 film directed by William Dieterle, starring Lizabeth Scott with Robert Cummings, Diana Lynn and Eve Arden. Poster is mounted on linen and framed. 31w x 40h.

Storyline: Jane Langley has always done all she can for her selfish sibling Nancy. When both sisters fall in love with handsome Bill Prentice, Jane graciously steps aside. Relationships among all three are further complicated when the now-married Bill realizes he’s still in love with Jane.

Lizabeth Scott bio:

Lizabeth Scott was born Emma Matzo on September 29, 1922 to Russian parents in Scranton, Pennsylvania. Scott attended Marywood Seminary and the Alvienne School of the Theatre in New York City, where she adopted the stage name of “Elizabeth Scott.” After doing a national tour of Hellzapoppin, she was discovered by Broadway producerMichael Myerberg in 1942. Scott was the understudy for Tallulah Bankhead in the original Broadway production of “The Skin of Our Teeth.” Later in 1943, a Warner Brothers producer, Hal B. Wallis, discovered Scott at her 21st birthday party held at the Stork Club in New York. Wallis scheduled an interview with Scott the following day, but Scott canceled it when a telegram asked her to replace Miriam Hopkins at the Boston production of The Skin of Our Teeth.

In 1944, Scott was invited to Los Angeles by agent Charles K. Feldman, who saw her photos in “Harpers Bazaar.” After failed screen tests at Universal, International, then Warner Brothers, Scott again met Wallis, who said he would hire her if he had the power. Scott mistakenly believed that Wallis was as powerful as Jack L. Warner, and did not believe him. The day Scott left for New York, she read in Variety that Wallis resigned from Warner and formed his own production company, releasing films primarily through Paramount. A few months later, she returned from New York and was finally signed to Paramount. Scott appeared in 21 films between 1945 and 1957, though loaned out for half of her films to United Artists, RKO and Columbia.

Scott’s first film was You Came Along (1945), with Robert Cummings as the leading man. This Ayn Rand scripted film introduced the 23-year old smoky blonde to the American public. In a role originally intended for Barbara Stanwyck, Scott played a US Treasury PR flack that falls in love with an Army Air Force officer, who tries to hide his terminal leukemia. Despite Scott’s difficulties with director John Farrow, who lobbied for Teresa Wright, the film remains one Scott’s favorites.

On the strength of her first performance, Wallis starred Scott in The Strange Love of Martha Ivers (1946) over Stanwyck’s protests. Scott ended up in third place at the top behind Stanwyck and Van Heflin, with Kirk Douglas, in his film debut, billed below the three stars. The film is actually two in one, with Stanwyck and Scott inhabiting two parallel worlds, both linked by Heflin. The female leads have only one brief scene together. The director, Lewis Milestone, swore never to work with Wallis again, who wanted to re-shoot all of Scott’s scenes, which Wallis had to do personally. The film boasts an Oscar nominated screenplay by screenplay by Robert Rossen, music by Miklós Rózsa, art direction by Hans Dreier, and costumes by Edith Head.

In Scott’s third film, she is cast with Humphrey Bogart in Dead Reckoning (1947). It is Scott’s first crack as the archetypal femme fatale. In Dead Reckoning she lures Bogart into a web of lies, and deceit. As is typical in the noir genre, her power is rooted in her beauty and sexual allure. In a departure from his tough guy roles, Bogart plays a wronged man (a noir hero), who struggles to learn the fate of a missing army buddy. Scott is the ex-girlfriend who knows more than she lets on. To keep Bogart from learning the truth about his lost friend and his mysterious double life, Scott seduces him into believing she loves him.

In her fourth film, Scott appeared in the second noir to be shot in color, Desert Fury(1947), a coming-of-age story scripted again by Robert Rossen, based on the novel “Desert Town” by Ramona StewartMary Astor is Fritzi Haller, a casino and bordello owner who runs the corrupt town of Chuckawalla, Nevada. She controls everyone in town, including the judge and sheriff’s office. The only one who dares defy Fritzi is her rebellious daughter Paula (Scott), who returns home after being expelled from another private school. When John Hodiak, a professional gambler, comes to town, Paula falls in love with him and trouble ensues. Then newcomers Burt Lancaster and Wendell Corey also appear.

In 1947, Scott was again cast with Lancaster and Kirk Douglas in I Walk Alone (1948), a story of betrayal and vengeance. Scott plays a nightclub singer who provides sympathy and support to Lancaster, recently released from prison to collect a debt, but is double-crossed by the Douglas character. Scott rises above it all and is completely convincing in her portrayal. Scott’s character provides a degree of romanticism and humanism usually lacking in film noir.

Film number seven was Pitfall (1948). Dick Powell played a middle-level insurance investigator, married to his high school sweetheart, Jane Wyatt. They living out a comfortable but boring existence in a post-war Los Angeles suburb. Powell is restless and unfulfilled (“I feel like a wheel within a wheel within a wheel”) when he receives what at first seems like a routine assignment to recover goods that have been bought with stolen money, a claim paid off by Powell’s firm. The items are traced to Mona Stevens (Scott), a model living in Marina Del Rey. Powell is attracted to her, and what starts out as innocent flirtation ends up in a passionate love affair. Powell’s journey into a daydream turns into a nightmare as he becomes a prisoner in his own home and kills an assailant, who has been set on his trail by a jealous private investigator, played by Raymond Burr. Meanwhile, the Burr character also blackmails Mona into doing private “fashion shows.”

In Too Late for Tears (1949), Scott played an avaricious Jane Palmer, a wife who goes to any length to keep $60,000 that is accidentally thrown in the back of her husband’s car. She eventually leaves behind a string of bodies in an effort to keep the money. This film is widely regarded by critics and viewers alike as Scott’s best performance and film. ‘Don Defore’, Dan DuryeaArthur Kennedy and Kristine Miller also star.

Also of interest is 1949′s Easy Living (1949), an intelligent, well-written film about an aging football star, played by Victor Mature, who struggles to adjust to his impending retirement, as well as the pressures brought on by an ambitious and defiant wife (Scott).Lucille Ball is commendable as the sympathetic team secretary and director Jacques Tourneur is first-rate. One of Scott’s finest roles, it is a favorite of many of her fans.

By the end of 1949 Scott appeared in nine films, but did not achieved the level of stardom and clout that was needed to maintain her popularity at the box-office. From 1950 on, she and Hal Wallis passed up numerous opportunities to maintain her stardom. Wallis passed up a chance to star Scott in Lillian Hellman’s Broadway play “Another Part of the Forest” (1946), later to made into the 1948 film. Scott herself passed up the lead in “The Rose Tattoo (19955), a decision she publicly regretted. She continued to make films such asDark City (1950), Red Mountain (1951), Two of a Kind (1951), Scared Stiff (1953) andBad for Each Other (1953). In February 1954, Scott did not renew her contract with Paramount and became a freelancer. She went on to make the western noir Silver Lode(1954) and The Weapon (1956).

In 1957 she retired from the big screen by starring with Elvis Presley in Loving You(1957), Presley’s second film. Also starring is newcomer Dolores Hart and veteran Wendell Corey. Since 1957 Scott appeared on a few television shows in the 1960s, during which time she attended the University of Southern California. She eventually became involved in real estate projects. Her legacy lives on however in the growing popularity of classic movies sparked by DVDs and movie channels such as AMC (American Movie Classics) and TCM (Turner Classic Movies).  (IMDB bio)

Anders Aldrin: Block Print, Forest & Field, Version 2 P1145

Version 2 of a great Forest & Field block print from Anders Aldrin.

 

 

Price on request.

Anders Gustave Aldrin was born in Varmland, Sweden, in 1889. He came to the U.S. when he was 21. He served his new country in France in WWI. Although he’d taken a correspondence course in art while still living in Sweden, it wasn’t until he settled in L.A. after WWI that his education took off.

Aldrin was a unique figure in contemporary American art. His art is individual, expressing his personal emotions and perceptions in a style that varied in technique, yet was always uniquely his. He painted for the pure love of it, drawing from his deep love of nature. This is what truly made him happy.

He graduated from Otis Art Institute in 1926 and won a scholarship to the Santa Barbara School of Fine Arts. It was there he studied under Fletcher who taught the Japanese Ukiyoe method of making woodblock prints. Aldrin was one of the first Americans to develop this print technique and was asked to teach in Paris yet he stayed in Southern California.

He was dedicated and went to the studio every day to work. Throughout the years he participated in all the local shows, galleries and museums, in groups as well as one man shows. He painted directly from nature, traveling up and down California, Oregon and Washington. His travels also included Europe, Asia and Russia.  He was also known for portraits.

He was professional artist and lived in Los Angeles for 46 years, though he traveled the world extensively, exhibiting and painting. Aldrin struggled with TB most of his life (from WWI on) and despite this illness, was an extremely prolific artist. He died in 1970.

Anders Aldrin: Block Print, Norfolk Pine & Coast P1144

Beautiful Anders Aldrin California Coastal View with bluffs, Norfolk Island Pine and sea.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Price on request.

 

Anders Aldrin: Block Print, Forest & Field, Version 1 P1143

Anders Aldrin block print, field and forest scene with great blue sky.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Price on request.

 

Anders Aldrin: Block Print, California Hills, Version 1 P1141

Great block print of a mountainous Southern California landscape by Anders Aldrin.

Price on request.

 

Anders Aldrin: Block Print, California Hills, Version 2 P1142

Another great block print of a California mountain landscape by Anders Aldrin.

Price on request.

 

Anders Aldrin A Grove In Los Angeles 1926 P1139

Many labels are applied to Aldrin’s work, Post-impressionist, Fauvist etc. The truth is that he was a 100% total original. Regarding this painting of trees, I will apply the term Visionary. Absolutely astonishing.

 

Price on request.

 

Anders Aldrin “To Moreno” 1926 P1138

A first rate portrait of a friend by an artist we are extremely excited about.

Painter, printmaker and sculptor, Aldrin was born in Värmland, Sweden. He immigrated to the U.S. in 1911, settling in Minnesota. He relocated to Southern California by 1923 where he began his studies at the Otis Art Institute, receiving the Huntington Assistance Award and a full scholarship to the Santa Barbara School of Art. Art. Aldrin learned the techniques of the Japanese color woodcut from Frank Morley Fletcher. In 1928, he studied for six months at the California School of Fine Arts in San Francisco before settling permanently in Los Angeles. That same year Aldrin made his first color woodcut and continued to experiment with the medium until 1937. Aldrin was a member of the California Art Club, California Water Color Society and the Los Angeles Art Association. He exhibited nationally and his work won several awards and is represented in numerous collections, including the Library of Congress, Boston Public Library and Rutgers University.

And that is just the merest tip of the iceberg.

18″ x 22″.

Price on request.

Anders Aldrin (1889-1970) Portrait of a Woman 1928 P1137

There is a wonderful relationship of background to figure that lends this portrait a dynamic tension, while the sitter’s pallor and the looser pattern of her dress allows her to break free of the darker papered wall. The dramatic reversal of the usual in his use of cool tones for the highlights in the face overlaying warmer skin tones marks Aldrin’s great originality as a colorist .

16″ x 20″.

 

Price on request.

Price on request

A painter as well as a print maker, Anders Aldrin (1889-1970) became known for his color wood-blocks and his paintings of still lifes, landscapes, and portraits using “broad, quick strokes and intense hues.”  Originally from Sweden, Aldrin showed artistic talent as a child. He immigrated to the United States in 1911, escaping his family who disapproved of him choosing art as a career. While in the army, he contracted tuberculosis and began painting at the VA hospital in Arizona.  There began one of the most individualistic and interesting careers in California painting.

Anders Aldrin Elysian Park 1943 P1136

Absolutely first rate oil sketch of a vanished Los Angeles. We got lost in this one. A great landscape artist.

18″ x 22″.

Anders Aldrin was an assiduous painter of his environment, of wherever he found himself, whether on a momentous return to his native Sweden, or during visits to wherever his children had settled, but the bulk of his attention as a painter was absorbed by Los Angeles, specifically by its Echo Park and Silverlake and other Eastside neighborhoods. By the end of his life this courageous late starter had forged an entirely individual path and created a body of work that is coming to be recognized as truly important.

Price on request.

Anders Aldrin (1889-1970) Morro Bay #2 P1135

One of a pair of extraordinarily fluent and powerful oil sketches (see P1134).

Anders Aldrin was a Swedish immigrant who began painting at the late age of 34. He studied at Otis Art Institute with Edouard Antonin Vysekal (1890-1939), before continuing on to the Santa Barbara School of Fine Arts and San Francisco. He worked under Frank Moreley Fletcher and among contemporaries Millard Sheets (1907-1989) and Milford Zornes (b. 1908). His modernist paintings of cityscapes, portraits and landscapes demonstrate a Fauvist impulse carried out by strong brushwork and a distinctive palette.

12″ x 16″

 

Price on request.

Anders Aldrin (1889-1970) Morro Bay #1 P1134

Anders Aldrin is a great original. This is one of a pair of oil sketches and it is as beautiful a painting as we’ve ever seen.  The other is P1135, and we think it as beautiful, and we hope they both stay together.

12″ x 16″

Price on request.

 

Anders Aldrin Beached Boat in California Harbor P1133

Aldrin’s oil sketches are especially exciting. This painter who sees volumes first where others see line produced a body of work that repays close study. An artist aware of everything being done in art, and who patiently went his own way.

12″ x 16″

Price on request.

Anders Gustave Aldrin was born in Varmland, Sweden, in 1889. He came to the U.S. when he was 21. He served his new country in France in WWI. Although he’d taken a correspondence course in art while still living in Sweden, it wasn’t until he settled in L.A. after WWI that his education took off.

Aldrin was a unique figure in contemporary American art. His art is individual, expressing his personal emotions and perceptions in a style that varied in technique, yet was always uniquely his. He painted for the pure love of it, drawing from his deep love of nature. This is what truly made him happy.

He graduated from Otis Art Institute in 1926 and won a scholarship to the Santa Barbara School of Fine Arts. It was there he studied under Fletcher who taught the Japanese Ukiyoe method of making woodblock prints. Aldrin was one of the first Americans to develop this print technique and was asked to teach in Paris yet he stayed in Southern California.

He was dedicated and went to the studio every day to work. Throughout the years he participated in all the local shows, galleries and museums, in groups as well as one man shows. He painted directly from nature, traveling up and down California, Oregon and Washington. His travels also included Europe, Asia and Russia.  He was also known for portraits.

He was professional artist and lived in Los Angeles for 46 years, though he traveled the world extensively, exhibiting and painting. Aldrin struggled with TB most of his life (from WWI on) and despite this illness, was an extremely prolific artist. He died in 1970.

Anders Aldrin California Harbor P1132

Anders Aldrin has taken us by storm. One of the most original California painters of the last century, and most admired by his fellow artists, his work continues to amaze us. This oil sketch is no exception.

12″ x 16″

Price on request

 

Emilio Lanzi “Dream & Reality” Oil on Board P1140

This is a fantastic image, too suggestive of reality to be filed away as abstract, too mysterious upon examination to be considered figurative. One may gaze, because one must, and one may imagine, in the way one imagines an evanescent imagery in clouds, for example. But there is a feel that almost allows one to pin it down, industrial, yet visionary, of the twenties and thirties, of smoke and fire, of sunlight and haze, of solidity and mirage. Extraordinary, in short.

22″ x 36″, 27″ x 41 1/4″ framed.

Price on request.

Emilio Lanzi 1884-1965

Emilio Lanzi is also known as Ernest Emil Lanz. He was an internationally known painter, lecturer, writer and teacher. Born in Bern, Switzerland, he studied at the Swiss Art Academy of Bern, at the Ecole des Beaux Arts, Colorossi, and Academie Julian of Paris, France.  Lanzi took a course in portraiture at the Academy at Munich, Germany, and two years of anatomy at the Sorbonne University of Paris. He studied with the greatest artist-teachers of the day, Robert Fleury, Plinio Colombi, Christopher Baumgartner, etc, and exhibited extensively in Europe and America. His work is represented in many private collections and galleries, and includes portraits and landscapes.

He taught at the Keszthelyi Academy of Fine Arts and held many positions of  responsibility at clubs and societies in the U.S. and abroad.  He was the President-Founder of the Atheneum of Philosophy, Science and Art, and a member of the AAPL, the Bohemian Club, Prof. Artists Guild, California Art Club, F.I.A.L., St. Martin, Hermetic Lodge, Gnostic Sc., Phoenix, Es. Phil., Masonic Lodge, and others.

He is well known for his California and Arizona Desert scenes, marines, still lives, portraits, large group compositions, and mythological and religious subject series. He received many medals, prizes and awards. He exhibited at the Greek Theater in Los Angeles in 1954.

Emilio and his wife, Theresa Lanzi, maintained a studio in Los Angeles, California.

George Hunt Spanish Colonial Highboy F1252

Circa 1926, solid walnut Spanish Colonial highboy by California furniture maker George S. Hunt. Measures 52h x 34w x 20.5.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Price on request.

Designer/furniture maker George S. Hunt’s Pasadena studio was adjacent to that of architect Wallace Neff back in the early 1900s. Hunt would be commissioned by Neff and other top designers and architects of the period to create furniture for their estates. He also produced his own line of exceptionally well-thought out and designed handcrafted pieces. Those with his distinctive pyrographic hallmark and/or brass plaques logo are very scarce.

 

Monterey Transitional Pair of Dark Smokey Maple Crackle Front Twin Beds F1254

Part of the same set as the Dresser and Highboy (F1250 and F1253) with the same Dark Smokey Maple and Crackle decoration, each of these all original beds measure 44.5w and 44.5h (headboard) and 28h (footboard). Price on request.

 

Monterey Transitional Dark Smokey Maple Crackle Front Highboy F1253

A companion piece to the Monterey Dresser F1250, this glorious Monterey Transitional Dark Smokey Maple Crackle front highboy is all original and in outstanding condition. The piece measures 35w x 47h x 17d. Price on request.

Monterey Classic Straw Ivory Vanity/Desk F1251

Sweet and classic, and this piece is part of a 5-piece Monterey Straw Ivory Bedroom set we’ve got at the shop. Vanity/desk measures 46.5w x 30h x 18d. Price on request.

Monterey Transitional Smokey Maple Crackle Top Dresser F1250

Circa 1934, Transitional Smokey Maple Finish Dresser with top drawer and bottom piece showing the original crackle floral decoration. Great piece. 33w x 42.5h x 17d.

Price on request.

Marshall Laird Spanish Colonial Revival Cabinet F1249

Huge Marshall Laird Spanish Colonial Revival Cabinet. It’s enormous, with upper cabinet storage as well as lower, with shelves. Back in the 1920s period of classic Los Angeles Spanish Revival decorating, furniture from Marshall Laird Co. was highly coveted. Now you can have this remarkable piece as your own. Cabinet measures 51.5w x 19d x 72h.

 

Price on request.

Portrait of a Man 19th Century Oil on Canvas P1123

Well, he comes from a family collection in Bakersfield. And he’s beautifully painted. And that’s what we know. Circa 1860-70.

14″ x 16″ framed.

Price on request.

D & M Drinks Tile Table CA537

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13″ x 13″ x 20″.

Absolutely gorgeous, and utterly simple. And incredibly handy. A drinks table. Superb wrought iron.  And those D & M tiles.

Price on request.

Los Castillo Salad Bowl & Serving Utensils M737

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shell inlaid silver-plate with a rosewood bowl insert with two age related cracks. A tour de force from Los Castillo, the great Taxco silver smiths.

Price on request.