Nicaraguan “Townscape” oil on Canvas Signed 1980’s P1475

Colorful Nicaraguan “townscape” with FSLN insignia on background mountain. Oil on board, 8 x 10. Signed, dated 1987, Carlos P., Serro, Motatepe, (sic) Nicaragua.

The Sandinista National Liberation Front (Spanish: Frente Sandinista de Liberación Nacional, FSLN) is now a democratic socialist political party in Nicaragua. Its members are called Sandinistas [sandiˈnistas] in both English and Spanish.

Cerro Motastepe is a hill and is located in Managua, Nicaragua.

Price on request.

 

Ernest Smythe “Cowboy on Horse” P1473

Ernest Smythe watercolor of a “Cowboy on a Horse.” Framed. Art is 8.d x 11.

Ernest Smythe was born in England in 1881.  Resident of Burbank in 1923-35.

Member:  Painters & Sculptors of LA.

Exh: Bark n’ Rags (LA), 1931.

Source: Edan Hughes, author of the book “Artists in California, 1786-1940”
City Directory; PF

 

Price on request.

Barr: Midcentury Illustration of Building and Autos P1471

Super cool watercolor illustration of a building and cars, so totally midcentury. Quintessentially Southern California. Signed “Barr.” Unframed, 24 x 30.

Price on request.

Ponderosa Reno Casino Architectural Original Rendering P1470

A fantastic Original 1960’s Architectural Rendering of the Ponderosa Casino Hotel. 30 x 40. Watercolor ink on board with Metallic Acetate Overlay. In rather great shape. A little History below.

RENO— In a city where gaudy neon advertises potential pleasures at every turn, the Ponderosa Casino has only one neon sign. Its message: ”No smoking.”

The Ponderosa, which bills itself as ”Reno’s breath of fresh air,” is a novel experiment in a city where casinos rarely try anything new. While other casinos have set aside some nonsmoking areas, the Ponderosa is reputed to be the only one in the world that does not allow smoking in its gaming areas, hotel rooms, restaurant and even the bar.

A no-smoking symbol, a red heart embracing a burning cigarette with a slash through it, is emblazoned on the doors of the Ponderosa as well as on the felt of blackjack tables. Scattered throughout the 9,000-square-foot casino are signs that say, ”For the health of it, the butt stops here.” There are no ashtrays among the 125 poker, keno, Megabucks and Quartermania slot machines.

The no-smoking casino was the creation of Bob Rusk, a nonsmoker who worked his way through college in a mortuary where he saw evidence of many smoking-related deaths, and his partner, Joe Keshmiri, a former discus thrower on four Iranian Olympic teams who did not smoke because of his involvement in athletics.

Mr. Keshmiri, who worked his way up in casinos from security guard to dealer to owner, conceded that some casino operators were skeptical about the Ponderosa’s chances of success. But he said: ”Society is ready for nonsmoking now. It’s the right time. Business is a gamble, so let’s gamble a little more.”

The Ponderosa, which has been open only a month and a half, is a gamble itself. The casino was closed for four years after it went through a succession of owners and ended up bankrupt.

Our Giant HALF PRICE Moving Sale Begins This Weekend!

You probably saw through our newsletters that Early California Antiques is busy moving locations. So, starting this Saturday and Sunday (April 8 & 9), and then continuing throughout the rest April, we commence with our enormous, gigantic, stupendous moving sale!

Deals abound — really — it’s insanely amazing the treasures we have for you on everything. In fact, just about all items in the store other than racked paintings will be 50% off. This includes art, furniture, pottery, lighting, accessories, vintage clothing, vintage liquor bottles, chandeliers and basically anything not nailed down! You can’t miss this. See the photos in this post to get a small idea of what’s in store for you starting tomorrow. Open Saturday 10-6 and Sunday 11-6.

See you this weekend!

Nocturnal Portrait of a Red Head Man with Bowtie P1474

A really unusual portrait of a man with Bow tie. Self Portrait?, Illustration for some mystery novel? we will never know except this piece packs an ambiance punch! 20 x 24. Not signed. Circa 1950.

Ernest Smythe Rare Original Cartoon cell Tom and Jerry P1472

Here we have a rare original Animation cell from the hand of Ernest Smythe . Purchased from his Grand Daughter recently. There are no real good bios and we are working on with the family. So according to family he came to the states before the Great war to New York and began working at Universal in New York City. When They moved to Hollywood after the war Ernest’s first credits started out at Walter Lanz Productions and he did many uncredited gigs as was often the case with artists in Hollywood at the time. It is known he worked on the story boards for the first King Kong. Later moving to Warner Brothers and working on Tom and Jerry in the 40’s. He enjoyed doing western watercolors on the side and we have one of those as well. Below is a UTUBE link to one of his first credited animation jobs.

Born 1881 in the UK

The cell is 9 x 11 and currently framed.

Ernest Smythe was born in England in 1881.  Resident of Burbank in 1923-35.
Member:  Painters & Sculptors of LA.
Exh: Bark n’ Rags (LA), 1931.
Edan Hughes, author of the book “Artists in California, 1786-1940”
City Directory; PF

Monterey Old Wood Classic Bench F1422

A hard to find early piece of Monterey. Classic Old Wood finish on a piece of furniture that everyone can use somewhere right!. Branded and in near perfect original Condition. Spring seat so you won’t put a run in your stocking.

Third Mesa Hopi Wicker Plaque A1244

A beautiful example of a Hopi Wicker Plaque. Third Mesa and in wonderful condition. No fade to color. 13.5″ wide. Checkerboard pattern in design.

Mexican Pottery Tree of Life with Owls M1009

Just a wonderful little tree of life in excellent condition. 7 x 7 x 4 in size. This one is unusual as it has small owls as decoration rather than the usual small generic birds most often scene. Missing one hanging bobble. No chips, Cracks or repairs.

Candelario Medrano Pottery Taxi with Driver M1007

We have had a number of Candelario’s  Buses and Airplanes but these smaller pieces seem to fall through the gaps with collectors. This one just released from a large private collection of everything ethnographic and wonderful. Its cute ready to pick up the weary tourist and take him or she a ride they will never forget 7 x 4 x 6

 

Candelario Medrano Man horse with skeleton M1010

Really unusual for this artist a pairing of sorts of a half man playing the trumpet and the body of a 4 legged animal with a skeleton on his back for good luck. One of several pieces from a private collection. Large 14 tall x 10 deep x 4 wide

The renowned Candelario Medrano (1918-1986) was one of the top figural ceramists in Mexico. He lived in Santa Cruz de las Huertas in the state of Jalisco, one of the largest pottery-producing states in Mexico.  As the adopted son of Julian Acero, the top ceramic toy maker in the village, Medrano learned to create his highly individualized pieces.  As many of the other people in the village Medrano produced sewer pipes for years before turning his imagination to the creation of whimsical castles, bandstands, churches, slim apartment buildings, circus tents, arks, owls,

animals, boats, trains, buses, taxis, cars and airplanes. Some of these pieces would be populated with groups of happy people, oftentimes with very expressive faces.  Another unique expression was the production of his nagual who was dual in nature.  He was your animal protective spirit or the boogie man. All of these were painted in wonderfully bright colors.  Medrano still remains a celebrated master of folk ceramics and his work continues to be collected around the world..

Catalina Island 14″ Charger Spanish Gypsy Singer by Chase C411

The last decorated plate from this little Catalina Island Collection. All three in excellent condition. This one is better than most done to this design with great detail and expression of Brush strokes. No chips, Cracks or repairs. Still has its original Price sticker of $3.75 Made in Catalina In 1929 $3.75 would be the equivalent to $52.50 today.

Catalina Island Decorated Charger by F.M. Graham Mexican Market Scene C410

These are never the same and all seem to based upon a market scene in either Mexico or Spanish Ruins. Colorful and bright. Great condition. Oil on Matt Ceramic. 14” wide and in wonderful condition. No chips, cracks or repairs.

Price on request

 

Catalina Island 12”Decorated wall Charger Junks in the harbor by Chase C409

An almost perfect specimen of a hand painted Decorated charger By Chase. Noted Artist who painted a large number of the Plates at Catalina Island Potteries along with Graham and others during the hey day of production.

Measures 12” across and in perfect condition. Minor paint loss to edge. as shown.

Price on request

Monterey Classic Old Wood Flip top Coffee table F1423

A great example of one of the most useful early pieces of Monterey Furniture. The Flip top Cogffee table . This all original Example in Old wood Just surfaced recently out of a large Monterey Collection in Ventura.

ClayCraft Mission Glazed Bookends Rare color CA615

The reason I love this business and genre. You never know what you will find out there that you have never seen before. From a major collection in Ventura that was mothballed for over 30 years as the heirs took each other to town and finally one came up the winner.

Glazed Book ends depicting the San Fernando and San Juan Capistrano Missions. With minor glaze chips but when have you ever seen these in such Beautiful Glazes??

Claycraft Potteries was established in 192l at 3101 San Fernando Road in Los Angeles. F. Dohrmann, Jr. was named president; Fred H. Robertson was hired as general superintendent. George B. Robertson, Fred’s son, joined the firm as a designer in 1925.

Claycraft’s decorative tiles, among the more collectible on the market today, provide some of the most definitive and idyllic imagery of the period. Tiles with medieval castles, knights on horseback, or heraldic paraphernalia, were designed to conjure up a sense of strength and security. The design, color and technical quality make these tiles prime examples of early twentieth century ceramic production in California.

The body of work achieved at Claycraft can be largely credited to the skill and attention of the two Robertsons, Fred and George, whose family had been successfully involved in ceramics for many generations. In 1934 the two departed to form Robertson Pottery. The last mention of Claycraft Potteries is found in city directories of 1939.

The company produced in excess of 500 different design tiles and published six catalogs of its products during the 1920s. A compilation of the six is offered by Tile Heritage as is a catalog of fireplace mantel illustrations published in the mid-1930s containing a number of tile designs not found elsewhere. (See THF U.S. Catalog Collection).

 

Washo Great basin Large gathering basket A1240

This large Washo gathering basket is 8 tall x 22 wide. Has a small loss on one edge as shown but in remarkable intact condition.

Louisa Keyser is perhaps the best known of the Washoe weavers, but she was only one of many. Other notable artists include Sarah Jim Mayo, Scees Bryant Possock, Maggie Mayo James, Lena Frank Dick, and Lillie Frank James. Not only did these women create and execute their own designs, they also harvested and processed the materials necessary to produce baskets. The harvesting and processing of willow and other basketry materials is time intensive and is comparable to the work of other nineteenth and twentieth century artists who harvested and processed plants for canvases, paints, brushes, clays, and such to create their artistic products. This intimate involvement with materials gives native basket weaving an extra dimension of artistry—a weaver has to find good material, harvest and process it to create the basket, and she must excel at all those skills in order to create remarkable art.

The most common type of basket woven during this period of what has been called “fancy basketry” was the degikup, a spherical, non-utilitarian basket produced by the technique of coiling. The primary basketry material is willow (Salix spp.), which is used to create the rods (warp) and the threads (weft). Bracken fern (Pteris aquilinium) and red bud (Cercis occidentalis) are the two primary materials used for the red and black decorative elements; both are processed into thread, which is spliced into the willow threads to create patterns on the light willow background. The three-rod technique, the form used originally and predominantly by the weavers of this period for the degikup, uses three willow stems to form the coils, which are curved along the horizontal plane and then sewn together with thread to create vertical height. Later artists switched to a one-rod technique, which produces a basket of somewhat less sculptural depth. The one-rod technique is less difficult and time intensive to produce, although not easy or quick by any means. The switch in styles reflected a response to the demands of the market. Other responses to market demands included lidded baskets, beaded baskets, and occasional chemically-dyed willow.

Washo Pauite Beaded basket circa 1930 A1242

Nice little beaded basket with very little bead loss at rim. Clean and lovely. Great design and detail. Small and ready for your collection. 2 x 3.5

 

The people of the Washoe tribe of Nevada and California have long practiced the art of weaving. Both men and women created the tools and products necessary to make a living in a land that required seasonal movements. Heavy pottery or bulky wooden items were not suited to this environment nor to the mobile lifestyle of the indigenous people. Harvesting willow, sagebrush, tules, reeds, ferns, and other fibrous plants, the people who occupied the western Great Basin and eastern Sierra Nevada mountains made clothes, mats, shoes, containers, nets, twine, tools, shelters, and such—items that were light, easily transported, and durable.

This necessity-based approach to weaving underwent a dramatic transformation during the years 1885 to 1935 when a national appreciation of traditional native arts surfaced in association with the Arts and Crafts movement. Beginning in England and moving to the United States, the Arts and Crafts artistic philosophy rejected the excesses of the Victorian era and chafed against the industrialization of the new century.

Native arts in particular were valued as reflecting a more natural and thus truer relationship of man to nature. Baskets especially were valued as they easily lent themselves to an artistic expression and appreciation. Tourist destinations such as Lake Tahoe presented opportunities for many weavers to sell their work, while women such as Louisa Keyser (Datsolalee) became recognized artists whose work was supported by patrons. Although the baskets were sometimes originally valued for their supposed link to the past rather than intrinsic artistic merit, the end result created a legacy of remarkable weavers and baskets.

Robert F Boyle Wilshire Blvd Temple 1933 Regional Watercolor P1463

Robert F Boyle Production designer extroidinaire. Started his long Hollywood career by studying architecture and art and the Pasadena Art College in the early 1930’s There he met lifelong friend Boris Levin and they painted regional watercolors all over the area. From Chavez Ravine to Beaumont. From Wilshire Boulevard to Old Mexico. These early watercolors really capture the light and color of the area as seen in the early 30’s. Robert and Boris both went on to work in the Film industry. Mr Boyle worked on over 100 films and is best noted for working with Hitchcock on North By Northwest and The Birds.

 

He was 98 when he received an honorary Oscar at the The 80th Annual Academy Awards (2008), making him the oldest Oscar recipient to date.
Art director and production designer.
He grew up on a ranch in the San Joaquin Valley.
He earned a degree in architecture in 1933, but it was of little help during the Depression. He worked as a bit player at RKO Pictures.
During WWII, he was a combat photographer for the Army Signal Corps in Europe.
Boyle started at Paramount as a draftsman, illustrator and set designer under the auspices of Hans Dreier. He did second unit work on Paramount’s The Plainsman (1936) and Union Pacific (1939), then went to Mexico to paint. Except for interludes at RKO (1946-47) and Columbia (1957-59), Boyle spent the bulk of his pre-1970 career at Universal (1941-43, 1947-56, 1961-64). He is best known for his fruitful collaboration with Alfred Hitchcock, beginning with Saboteur (1942), for which he created a studio model of the hand and torch of the Statue of Liberty, used for the climactic final scene. OHis other famous contributions include the crop-dusting plane strafing Cary Grant in North by Northwest (1959) (for which he combined small models with location footage) and his clever montage work of the seagulls swooping on Tippi Hedren in The Birds (1963).
Latterly taught students at the American Film Institute.
Inducted into the Art Directors Hall of Fame in 2012.
Delivered moving comments on his career and the art of moviemaking when given an honorary Oscar at the 80th Academy Awards presentation on February 24, 2008 at age 98. [February 2008]Personal Quotes (4)
[his definition of the job of an art director or production designer] Being responsible for the space in which a film takes place.
I’m all for construction [of a film’s setting], because we’re dealing with the magic of movies. And I always feel that if you build it, you build it for the dream rather than the actuality. We make up our own truth.
[on Alfred Hitchcock] No director I’ve worked with knew as much about films as he did. A lot of directors I worked with knew a great deal, but they didn’t have that technical skill.
[on working with Alfred Hitchcock] On each picture I recognized again, as if for the first time, that I was working with a master. He is one of the few who really knows the materials of his craft and their effect–and he will use anything–in any combination, in any form, conventional or not–to make his statement, to tell his story.

Robert F Boyle Early California Regional Watercolor Gardner Inn P1464

Robert F Boyle Production designer extroidinaire. Started his long Hollywood career by studying architecture and art and the Pasadena Art College in the early 1930’s There he met lifelong friend Boris Levin and they painted regional watercolors all over the area. From Chavez Ravine to Beaumont. From Wilshire Boulevard to Old Mexico. These early watercolors really capture the light and color of the area as seen in the early 30’s. Robert and Boris both went on to work in the Film industry. Mr Boyle worked on over 100 films and is best noted for working with Hitchcock on North By Northwest and The Birds.

This lovely watercolor of the Gardner Inn now lost to history is just one of many wonderful examples we have of his work currently in stock from the families Estate.

Robert F. Boyle was born on October 10, 1909 in Los Angeles, California, USA as Robert Francis Boyle. He was an art director and production designer, known for The Thomas Crown Affair (1968), In Cold Blood (1967) and North by Northwest (1959). He was married to Bess Boyle. He died on August 1, 2010 in Los Angeles.

He was 98 when he received an honorary Oscar at the The 80th Annual Academy Awards (2008), making him the oldest Oscar recipient to date.
Art director and production designer.
He grew up on a ranch in the San Joaquin Valley.
He earned a degree in architecture in 1933, but it was of little help during the Depression. He worked as a bit player at RKO Pictures.
During WWII, he was a combat photographer for the Army Signal Corps in Europe.
Boyle started at Paramount as a draftsman, illustrator and set designer under the auspices of Hans Dreier. He did second unit work on Paramount’s The Plainsman (1936) and Union Pacific (1939), then went to Mexico to paint. Except for interludes at RKO (1946-47) and Columbia (1957-59), Boyle spent the bulk of his pre-1970 career at Universal (1941-43, 1947-56, 1961-64). He is best known for his fruitful collaboration with Alfred Hitchcock, beginning with Saboteur (1942), for which he created a studio model of the hand and torch of the Statue of Liberty, used for the climactic final scene. OHis other famous contributions include the crop-dusting plane strafing Cary Grant in North by Northwest (1959) (for which he combined small models with location footage) and his clever montage work of the seagulls swooping on Tippi Hedren in The Birds (1963).
Latterly taught students at the American Film Institute.

Carl Hugo Beetz “Billie the kid” P1468

Billie the kid by Carl Hugo Beetz really captures the moment. Black and white. Ink, watercolor and pencil give this Illustration depth and 30’s toughness.

A painter and printmaker, Carl Beetz is known for his watercolor regionalist and social-real scenes of poverty stricken people such as figures in pool halls, at the race track, etc. He was born in San Francisco and studied at the California School of Fine Arts with Eric Spencer Macky, the Art Students League with George Bridgman, and the Chouinard Institute with Pruett Carter.

Beetz was a member of the California Watercolor Society and the Society of Etchers. From 1935 to 1944, he was an instructor at the Chouinard Art Institute. He also taught at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland and at San Francisco Junior College.

Source:
Edan Hughes, “Artists in California, 1786-1940”
Peter Falk, “Who Was Who   …

Carl Hugo Beetz Jockeys in the Locker room Oil on Board P1467

Carl Beetz seems to paint and illustrate with great humor and here we have Jockeys in the Locker room. Large in scale Recently cleaned. Circa 1935.

A painter and printmaker, Carl Beetz is known for his watercolor regionalist and social-real scenes of poverty stricken people such as figures in pool halls, at the race track, etc. He was born in San Francisco and studied at the California School of Fine Arts with Eric Spencer Macky, the Art Students League with George Bridgman, and the Chouinard Institute with Pruett Carter.

Beetz was a member of the California Watercolor Society and the Society of Etchers. From 1935 to 1944, he was an instructor at the Chouinard Art Institute. He also taught at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland and at San Francisco Junior College.

Source:
Edan Hughes, “Artists in California, 1786-1940”
Peter Falk, “Who Was Who   …

Andres Aldrin Self Portrait P1465

A rare and unsual piece from the Aldrin Collection. The Only Self Portrait in the collection. Framed and given a custom plate.

Anders Aldrin was a Swedish immigrant who began painting at the late age of 34. He studied at Otis Art Institute with Edouard Antonin Vysekal (1890-1939), before continuing on to the Santa Barbara School of Fine Arts and San Francisco. He worked under Frank Moreley Fletcher and among contemporaries Millard Sheets (1907-1989) and Milford Zornes (b. 1908). His modernist paintings of cityscapes, portraits and landscapes demonstrate a Fauvist impulse carried out by strong brushwork and a distinctive palette.

Born in 1889 in Stjernsfors, Sweden, Aldrin grew up in a family of little means. As a youth, he showed artistic promise but was not encouraged to pursue his creative interests. At age 22, after working for 12 years to support his family, Aldrin immigrated to Chicago. Soon after, he moved to Minneapolis and joined the growing population of Swedish farmers. There, he met and married Mabel Esther Lindberg, the daughter of a Swedish Baptist minister. In 1918, he traveled to France to serve in World War I. After a year, he contracted tuberculosis and was sent to the Veteran’s Administration Hospital in Prescott, Arizona. While healing, he returned to his childhood interest of painting. This convalescence served as a turning point for Aldrin. After his recovery, he moved to Los Angeles and enrolled for study at the Otis Art Institute where he studied under Edouard Antonin Vysekal. At the relatively late age of 34, he dedicated his life’s work almost entirely to painting.

From Otis, he received a scholarship and was described as “one of the best trained and most promising students.” Aldrin moved to Santa Barbara in 1927 with a scholarship to study at the Santa Barbara School of Fine Arts under Frank Morley Fletcher (a Japanese color woodblock specialist). After completing his studies at Otis, he interspersed work in oils, watercolors, and woodcuts with courses at the California School of Fine Arts in San Francisco. In 1935, the Los Angeles Museum featured his work in his first solo exhibition.

Thereafter, Aldrin’s work was featured in many shows and received high critical praise. In 1940, Arthur Millier called his Echo Park “perhaps the only profound job of painting in this best show the society has ever put on.” Despite this praise, he never achieved a high level of commercial success. The reality of life as an artist was difficult for Aldrin, but he managed his time and money to paint.

Through the 1940s, Aldrin exhibited his work in group shows, receiving prizes and critical acclaim. He painted his surroundings; friends and family, and scenes from the burgeoning city of Los Angeles. He spent six months in New England in 1945, exhibiting his works in a solo show at the Pasadena Art Institute. In 1952, his solo show in Hafgors, Sweden, was a great success. Both artist Lorser Feitelson and Aldrin himself felt his art would have “sold like hotcakes” in Europe.

Although he participated in exhibitions, Aldrin always rejected the commercialization of his art in favor of his own unique style. When he wasn’t working in Los Angeles, he painted in Japan and Sweden, focusing intently on the use of color to reveal the essence of his subject. Aldrin’s techniques were never static, in fact, in 1969, a year before his death, he maintained his independent and modern spirit by painting in acrylic, calling it “a marvelous medium in which you can get any color you wish.”